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Trump refuses to answer questions at press briefing after disinfectant suggestion, Rep. Tim Ryan explains what Democrats need to do for the working class

Healthy Lifestyle

Trump refuses to answer questions at press briefing after disinfectant suggestion, Rep. Tim Ryan explains what Democrats need to do for the working class

Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, listens as President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Thursday, April 23, 2020, in Washington. AP Photo/Alex Brandon We’ll keep this page updated with the biggest coronavirus headlines of the day. Scroll down for more information […]

Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, listens as President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Thursday, April 23, 2020, in Washington.
Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, listens as President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Thursday, April 23, 2020, in Washington.

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

We’ll keep this page updated with the biggest coronavirus headlines of the day. Scroll down for more information on each story and check back for updates.

Here’s the latest:

  • ‘Let Mitch McConnell say no to it’: Rep. Tim Ryan explains his plan to help the working class and give nearly every American over 16 years old $2,000 per month during the pandemic.

  • Trump refuses to take questions at White House briefing the day after floating the false idea that disinfectant might be injected to kill coronavirus.

  • 16 states are easing restrictions next week. Here’s a breakdown of which stores will be allowed to reopen in each one.

  • Some businesses in Georgia cautiously opened today, but many store and restaurant owners aren’t ready to take the risk.

  • Dow climbs 260 points as tech shares, oil rebound drive gains.

  • Trump claims he was being sarcastic ‘to see what would happen’ when he suggested Americans might be able to inject household cleaners to treat coronavirus.

  • Oklahoma is beginning to reopen today. Its small business owners are struggling to choose between their financial and personal health.

  • Trump signed a new $484 billion stimulus package into law.

  • A slew of new studies are raising fresh doubts on whether malaria pills should be used to treat the coronavirus, and a top US health agency just warned against widespread use.

  • ‘The country is in a state of trauma’: COVID-19 has made the US a breeding ground for propaganda and a goldmine for foreign spies.

Data Ticker – Covid 19 Global and US

‘Let Mitch McConnell say no to it’: Rep. Tim Ryan explains his plan to help the working class and give nearly every American over 16 years old $2,000 per month during the pandemic.

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio / Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.
Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio / Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.

L: AP Photo/John Locher R: House Television via AP

Rep. Tim Ryan, a moderate Democrat from Ohio, told Business Insider that Democrats need to be bold and include more aggressive stimulus measures in their next response to the pandemic.

“I want everybody to say, ‘Look, Democrats understood what I was going through, and they pushed hard,'” Ryan said in an interview. “Let Mitch McConnell say no to it.”

Ryan’s frustrations seem to be shared by more progressive members of the Democratic caucus, such as Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who voted against the most recent stimulus measure, saying it did not do enough for working families.

“By giving Republicans what they wanted in [that] bill without extracting any real concessions from them, we eliminated any incentive for them to work with us on these other urgent needs,” a spokesperson for Ocasio-Cortez told Business Insider.

Read more

Trump refuses to take questions at White House briefing the day after floating the false idea that disinfectant might be injected to kill coronavirus.

President Donald Trump steps away from the lectern to allow Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, to speak about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Friday, April 24, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
President Donald Trump steps away from the lectern to allow Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, to speak about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Friday, April 24, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Associated Press

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence took no questions from reporters on Friday during an unusually short White House coronavirus task force briefing.

Only one reporter was able to ask a question of FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn about the trustworthiness of new tests being developed to detect the coronavirus and antibodies.

The truncated briefing comes after Trump made some of his most bizarre claims yet about potential treatments for the novel coronavirus, including finding some way to bring “very powerful light” into people’s bodies and mused, “I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in one minute and is there a way you can do something like that by injection inside, or almost a cleaning.”

The White House press secretary later said his comments had been taken out of context, and Trump said he was being sarcastic.

Critics of the president have called for networks to stop airing the White House coronavirus task force briefings, during which Trump has been known to tout unproven treatments for the virus and contradict his experts.

The briefings often become chaotic and combative during question-and-answer sessions with reporters.

Read more

16 states are easing restrictions next week. Here’s a breakdown of which stores will be allowed to reopen in each one.

Kelly Shiotani is the owner of Dojo sushi restaurant in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Kelly Shiotani is the owner of Dojo sushi restaurant in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Jim Urquhart/AP

As new cases of the coronavirus seem to plateau in some areas, 16 states are planning to begin their reopening processes next week.

Each state’s timelines and regulations will be as different as they were when the country shut down.

Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming have all announced plans to reopen certain nonessential businesses next week.

Here’s a breakdown of the businesses each state plans to allow to reopen next week.

Read more

Some businesses in Georgia cautiously opened today, but many store and restaurant owners aren’t ready to take the risk.

Dan Settle sits outside Chris' Barber Shop as he waits his turn for a haircut in Lilburn, Georgia on April 24, 2020
Dan Settle sits outside Chris’ Barber Shop as he waits his turn for a haircut in Lilburn, Georgia on April 24, 2020

Tami Chappell/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp relaxed social distancing restrictions on Friday, despite warnings from health experts of a surge in coronavirus cases if the month-long lockdown was lifted too early.

Gyms, barbershops, hair and nail salons, spas, and tattoo parlors can resume business, but many have chosen not to. Elective medical procedures have also been greenlit.

Movie theaters and restaurants can open to the public starting Monday.

Throngs of people have converged at anti-lockdown protests in the southern state, which has reported at least 22,147 coronavirus cases and 892 deaths as of Friday.

Read more

Dow climbs 260 points as tech shares, oil rebound drive gains.

FILE PHOTO: A trader wears a mask as he works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) as the building prepares to close indefinitely due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in New York
FILE PHOTO: A trader wears a mask as he works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) as the building prepares to close indefinitely due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in New York

Reuters

US stocks rose Friday after the House passed a nearly $500 billion coronavirus relief package Thursday night.

The bill will provide more money to small businesses, hospitals, and ramp up coronavirus testing.

Oil prices rebounded, reversing some losses from historic lows earlier in the week.

Investors also looked to first quarter earnings reports. Many companies have lowered guidance for future performance amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Read more

Trump claims he was being sarcastic ‘to see what would happen’ when he suggested Americans might be able to inject household cleaners to treat coronavirus.

President Donald Trump signs a coronavirus aid package to direct funds to small businesses, hospitals, and testing, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, April 24, 2020, in Washington. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., left, and Jovita Carranza, administrator of the Small Business Administration look on. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump signs a coronavirus aid package to direct funds to small businesses, hospitals, and testing, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, April 24, 2020, in Washington. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., left, and Jovita Carranza, administrator of the Small Business Administration look on. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Associated Press

President Donald Trump claimed he was being sarcastic “to see what would happen” when he suggested on live television that Americans inject themselves with household disinfectants as a treatment for coronavirus.

“I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in a minute — one minute — and is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside, or almost a cleaning?” Trump mused on Thursday. “Because you see it gets in the lungs, and it does a tremendous number on the lungs. So it’d be interesting to check that.”

Doctors, scientists, and industry leaders subsequently put out multiple statements warning against using disinfectants to treat health issues.

The Maryland Emergency Management Agency also posted an alert to Twitter on Friday saying it had “received several calls regarding questions about disinfectant use and #COVID19.”

“Under no circumstances should any disinfectant product be administered into the body through injection, ingestion or any other route,” the agency warned.

Read more

Oklahoma is beginning to reopen today. Its small business owners are struggling to choose between their financial and personal health.

Jesus Ruiz cuts hair at Ivan Barber Studio on the Main Street in Guymon, Oklahoma, a city where local shops remain open as there has yet to be a positive case of coronavirus, in Guymon, U.S., March 26, 2020. Picture taken March 26, 2020.
Jesus Ruiz cuts hair at Ivan Barber Studio on the Main Street in Guymon, Oklahoma, a city where local shops remain open as there has yet to be a positive case of coronavirus, in Guymon, U.S., March 26, 2020. Picture taken March 26, 2020.

REUTERS/Andrew Hay

Oklahoma begins a multi-phase reopening of state businesses on Friday.

Small business owners are feeling the pressure of unpaid bills — and the risk of infection — as they await government loans and support funds.

“Everyone is cautious about opening,” one small business owner told Business Insider.
Another said: “I want to go back to work tomorrow. I’m tired of this.”

Read more

Trump signed a new $484 billion stimulus package into law.

President Donald Trump looks at the $2.2 trillion coronavirus aid package bill as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) and Vice President Mike Pence stand by during a signing ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, March 27, 2020.
President Donald Trump looks at the $2.2 trillion coronavirus aid package bill as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) and Vice President Mike Pence stand by during a signing ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, March 27, 2020.

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

President Donald Trump signed a $484 billion stimulus package into law on Friday.

The bill passed the House on Thursday, with four Republicans and one Democrat voting against it.

Lawmakers are still expected to put together another larger package to follow the CARES Act.

Read more

A slew of new studies are raising fresh doubts on whether malaria pills should be used to treat the coronavirus, and a top US health agency just warned against widespread use.

A strip of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an anti-malarial drug.
A strip of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an anti-malarial drug.

Samir Jana/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

A new clinical study in Brazil raises safety concerns about coronavirus patients taking a high dose of the anti-malaria drug chloroquine.

The trial is one of several recent reports that suggest caution in widely using chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine in people infected with the novel coronavirus.

The recent studies have limitations that prevent definitive conclusions from being reached about the drugs.

In the meantime, leading US health agencies have cautioned against treating COVID-19 patients with these drugs.

There is no high-quality evidence showing these medicines help COVID-19 patients. Large studies that can answer that question are now underway.

Read more

‘The country is in a state of trauma’: COVID-19 has made the US a breeding ground for propaganda and a goldmine for foreign spies.

Supporters of the Michigan Conservative Coalition protest against the state's extended stay-at-home order, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the Capitol building in Lansing, Michigan, April 15, 2020.
Supporters of the Michigan Conservative Coalition protest against the state’s extended stay-at-home order, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the Capitol building in Lansing, Michigan, April 15, 2020.

Seth Herald/Reuters

The novel coronavirus outbreak has upended everyday life in the US and turned the country into a breeding ground for fake news and disinformation as citizens increasingly distrust their leaders and each other.

Paul Barrett, a professor at NYU who published a report on disinformation and the 2020 election, told Insider he’s seen an explosion in domestically sourced propaganda amid the outbreak.

Heightened tensions and partisanship in the US make it a “natural target” for foreign interference as well, John McLaughlin, the former acting director of the CIA, told Insider.

Anti-lockdown protests organized by wealthy conservative interests are popping up across the US. The data analysis firm Graphika also documented a surge in xenophobic disinformation and conspiracies from right-wing groups.

Russian trolls are adapting their 2016 strategy to be less conspicuous, and China is taking a page out of Russia’s playbook as both countries wage intense, coordinated disinformation campaigns against the US.

Read more

This map shows where cases are concentrated in the US.

 

A global map shows the distribution of cases worldwide.

 

See how cases and deaths worldwide have risen over time since the outbreak began.

 

See our live tracker of coronavirus cases worldwide.

 

Read the original article on Business Insider

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